L.A. Modern

Just In: John Baldessari

March 28, 2018

Los Angeles Modern Auctions (LAMA)

Over the course of his long career, John Baldessari has expressed a deep infatuation with the relationship between the semantics of the written word and those inherent to visual language. His work often addresses the ways in which various visual and verbal codes both enable and destabilize modes of communication and meaning-making. “Words and imagery are both magical conveyors of meaning,” he once explained. In the upcoming June 10, 2018 auction, we are delighted to have the opportunity to include the complete set of five lithographs, which Baldessari created in response to Laurence Sterne’s classical, eighteenth-century masterwork, “The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman.”

Peter’s Auction Pick of the Day: Assemblage Art

February 22, 2018

Assemblage art hasn’t lost any steam over the years and Los Angeles Modern Auctions is thrilled to include a group of pieces by four important American artists who produced work in the assemblage idiom: Joseph Cornell, Betye Saar, Chris Ferebee, and Louise Nevelson in the February 25, 2018 Modern Art & Design Auction.

Peter’s Auction Pick of the Day: New York Pop

February 21, 2018

Los Angeles Modern Auctions (LAMA)

Each auction at Los Angeles Modern Auctions has its knockout pieces, but Pop artworks in particular have a tendency to regularly stand out with their electrifying color palettes and playful imagery sourced from popular culture. Pop art has a way of remaining fresh and of-the-moment regardless of the era that inspired it — a fact that is continually demonstrated in the wake of each auction we host at LAMA.

Artist Spotlight: Nicole Eisenman

February 7, 2018

Los Angeles Modern Auctions (LAMA)

When Brooklyn-based artist Nicole Eisenman’s bold, idiosyncratic work first hit the walls of New York galleries in the early nineties, no one knew how to respond. Was it a feminist revision of art history? A disruptive “queering” of trite scenes culled from popular cartoons and commercial culture? A satirical psychoanalytical take on the monstrousness of public and private human experience? The answer, it turns out, was all of the above and then some. With its unique blend of lucid and imaginative elements, and gloriously awkward merging of the banal with the absurd, her 1992 Bacon-esque portrait Jew Drag King eludes simple categorization. The work is an inversion of mainstream conventions synthesized with counterculture lifestyles, creating a figurative language distinct to Eisenman.

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