James Rosenquist

b. 1933
Lot 100
James Rosenquist
House of Fire
Estimate: $15,000 - $20,000
Price Realized: $25,000
November 18, 2018
Lot 290
James Rosenquist
Sky Hole (from Welcome to the Water Planet)
Estimate: $8,000 - $12,000
Price Realized: $7,500
September 30, 2018
Lot 291
James Rosenquist
Cold Rolled
Estimate: $3,000 - $5,000
Price Realized: $3,438
September 30, 2018
Lot 292
James Rosenquist
Time Stream Prix Nobel
Estimate: $800 - $1,200
Price Realized: $1,500
September 30, 2018
Lot 200
James Rosenquist
Spring Cheer
Estimate: $1,500 - $2,000
Price Realized: $2,000
June 10, 2018
Lot 213
James Rosenquist
Jet Engines and Dinner Triangles
Estimate: $30,000 - $40,000
Price Realized: $34,375
February 25, 2018
Lot 214
James Rosenquist
High Technology and Mysticism: A Meeting Point Portfolio (7)
Estimate: $4,000 - $6,000
Price Realized: $4,375
February 25, 2018
Lot 41
James Rosenquist
More Points on a Bachelor's Tie
Estimate: $1,500 - $2,000
Price Realized: $3,125
October 22, 2017
Lot 331
James Rosenquist
Shriek (from Secrets in Carnations)
Estimate: $7,000 - $9,000
Price Realized: $11,875
October 9, 2016
Lot 333
James Rosenquist
Untitled
Estimate: $800 - $1,200
Price Realized: $1,187
October 9, 2016
Lot 28
James Rosenquist
A Free for All
Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
Price Realized: $1,000
May 22, 2016
Lot 314
James Rosenquist
Fire Fountain–Speed of Light
Estimate: $3,000 - $5,000
Price Realized: $3,750
October 11, 2015
Lot 75
James Rosenquist
Chambers
Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
Price Realized: $2,500
May 17, 2015
Lot 453
James Rosenquist
Where the Water Goes
Estimate: $7,000 - $9,000
Price Realized: $8,750
October 12, 2014
Lot 186
James Rosenquist
Off the Continental Divide
Estimate: $9,000 - $12,000
Price Realized: $10,250
February 23, 2014
Lot 192
James Rosenquist
Earth and Moon
Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
Price Realized: $1,375
October 13, 2013
Lot 193
James Rosenquist
When a leak...
Estimate: $3,000 - $5,000
Price Realized: $3,437
October 13, 2013
Lot 378
James Rosenquist
Cold Rolled
Estimate: $4,000 - $6,000
Price Realized: $6,875
October 7, 2012
Lot 380
James Rosenquist
Star Ladder
Estimate: $1,500 - $2,000
Price Realized: $750
October 7, 2012
Lot 483
James Rosenquist
Star Proctor
Estimate: $1,200 - $1,500
Price Realized: $1,500
May 6, 2012
Lot 447
James Rosenquist
When a leak . . .
Estimate: $1,800 - $2,500
Price Realized: $3,125
December 11, 2011
Lot 448
James Rosenquist
Windscreen Horizon
Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
Price Realized: $1,500
December 11, 2011
Lot 285
James Rosenquist
Art Gallery
Estimate: $700 - $900
Price Realized: $1,500
March 6, 2011
Lot 431
James Rosenquist
Cold Spaghetti
Estimate: $2,500 - $3,500
Price Realized: $2,400
June 29, 2008
Lot 278
James Rosenquist
Window Washer Glass House
Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
Price Realized: $1,140
February 10, 2008
Lot 172
James Rosenquist
Untitled
Estimate: $1,500 - $2,000
Price Realized: $1,080
June 18, 2006

About The Artist

One of the most recognisable artists of the Pop art movement, James Rosenquist (b. 1933) is one of the leading American artists of the 20th century.

Born in North Dakota, Rosenquist’s parents were amateur pilots who travelled the country before basing themselves in Minneapolis. There Rosenquist was awarded a scholarship at the Minneapolis School of Art, going on to study painting at the University of Minnesota from 1952 – 1954. Rosenquist moved to New York City in 1955 to study at the Art Students League. There he established himself as an artist alongside contemporaries like Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg and Roy Lichtenstein.

Rosenquist worked as a commercial artist and sign-painter in the late 1950s and put this training to use in vast, billboard-style canvases which appropriated images from advertising. A graphic sensibility is evident in the work’s sharp lines, bright colors and juxtaposition of photo-realist fragments. In order to create these works, Rosenquist began making collages in the 1960s and creating two-dimensional paintings from these physical montages. The artist is known for the ambitious scale of his works and has executed numerous large paintings, including a mural at the New York World's Fair in 1964 as well as his most famous work, F-111 in 1965, which reaches over 26 metres long.

Influenced by popular culture and magazine design, this deadpan aesthetic is reminiscent of the work of Andy Warhol. Furthermore, Rosenquist’s choice of everyday subjects, from household products and movie star faces to fighter jets and fast cars, served as a critique of mass media. Rosenquist has described the development of his perspective on commodity culture in numerous interviews; having lived on the poverty line as a young artist in New York, he felt estranged from the capitalist system: “My values had changed… In a country where capitalists advertise in media—I lost track of all that. That put my mind in a whole different situation. I tried to develop some ground, some idea—where people could look at something, yet appreciate it for a different kind of value… I’ll use this with the same power that I had painted billboards—the same strength and intensity and exactness used for selling these products, but they won’t be made and they won’t be painted to be sold. We are numbed in this atmosphere as young children and young people. So l decided that I was going to work in this advertising media numbness.”

Rosenquist’s work features in several important major collections worldwide including Tate Modern, London; Hara Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo; Museum Ludwig, Cologne; Moderna Museet, Stockholm; Guggenheim Museum, Bilbao; Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; MoMA, New York and Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, D.C.

 

Dickerman, L., “Interview with James Rosenquist”. The Museum of Modern Art Archives. April, 17, 2012. Web. October 10, 2016. Staniszewski, M.A., “James Rosenquist”. BOMB 21. Fall, 1987. Web. October 10, 2016.

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