Frederick Hammersley

(1919 - 2009)

Frederick Hammersley’s Adjective (1966) (Lot 309) brought $100,000 in the March 1, 2015 Modern Art & Design Auction, a new world auction record for the artist–exceeding his past eight top prices, all set by LAMA.

Lot 178
Frederick Hammersley
Biased
Estimate: $30,000 - $50,000
June 10, 2018
Lot 169
Frederick Hammersley
Home run
Estimate: $50,000 - $70,000
Price Realized: $200,000
February 25, 2018
Lot 190
Frederick Hammersley
On and of
Estimate: $35,000 - $55,000
Price Realized: $50,000
October 22, 2017
Lot 191
Frederick Hammersley
Act One
Estimate: $3,000 - $5,000
Price Realized: $4,062
October 22, 2017
Lot 192
Frederick Hammersley
Covenant
Estimate: $1,500 - $2,000
Price Realized: $3,750
October 22, 2017
Lot 205
Frederick Hammersley
Untitled (Three Circles)
Estimate: $5,000 - $7,000
Price Realized: $1,650
May 21, 2017
Lot 289
Frederick Hammersley
Covenant
Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
Price Realized: $2,125
March 5, 2017
Lot 65
Frederick Hammersley
PLENTY IS PLENTY
Estimate: $3,000 - $5,000
Price Realized: $3,125
October 9, 2016
Lot 66
Frederick Hammersley
YO-YO A-GAIN
Estimate: $3,000 - $5,000
Price Realized: $3,750
October 9, 2016
Lot 177
Frederick Hammersley
Agree
Estimate: $40,000 - $60,000
Price Realized: $46,875
February 21, 2016
Lot 178
Frederick Hammersley
Tit for Tat
Estimate: $15,000 - $20,000
Price Realized: $23,750
February 21, 2016
Lot 179
Frederick Hammersley
Knee Portrait
Estimate: $4,000 - $6,000
Price Realized: $7,500
February 21, 2016
Lot 332
Frederick Hammersley
Opposing
Estimate: $50,000 - $70,000
Price Realized: $75,000
October 11, 2015
Lot 307
Frederick Hammersley
Sticks
Estimate: $12,000 - $15,000
Price Realized: $20,000
March 1, 2015
Lot 308
Frederick Hammersley
ENOUGH IS PLENTY, #29
Estimate: $5,000 - $7,000
Price Realized: $6,250
March 1, 2015
Lot 309
Frederick Hammersley
Adjective
Estimate: $60,000 - $90,000
Price Realized: $100,000
March 1, 2015
Lot 366
Frederick Hammersley
In Two #27
Estimate: $30,000 - $50,000
Price Realized: $81,250
October 12, 2014
Lot 40
Frederick Hammersley
Chinese Toys
Estimate: $30,000 - $50,000
Price Realized: $43,750
February 23, 2014
Lot 15
Frederick Hammersley
Fractions #17
Estimate: $15,000 - $20,000
Price Realized: $37,500
October 13, 2013
Lot 16
Frederick Hammersley
Pairable #6
Estimate: $10,000 - $15,000
Price Realized: $35,000
October 13, 2013
Lot 17
Frederick Hammersley
Field Day
Estimate: $12,000 - $15,000
Price Realized: $23,750
October 13, 2013
Lot 18
Frederick Hammersley
Day One
Estimate: $3,000 - $5,000
Price Realized: $6,250
October 13, 2013
Lot 243
Frederick Hammersley
Untitled
Estimate: $3,000 - $5,000
Price Realized: $3,438
December 16, 2012
Lot 63
Frederick Hammersley
Untitled
Estimate: $3,000 - $5,000
Price Realized: $3,437
October 7, 2012
Lot 64
Frederick Hammersley
Untitled
Estimate: $3,000 - $5,000
Price Realized: $3,750
October 7, 2012
Lot 65
Frederick Hammersley
Different Quarters #12
Estimate: $15,000 - $20,000
Price Realized: $36,250
October 7, 2012
Lot 66
Frederick Hammersley
Middle East
Estimate: $10,000 - $15,000
Price Realized: $20,000
October 7, 2012
Lot 67
Frederick Hammersley
Me To (#1)
Estimate: $25,000 - $35,000
Price Realized: $31,250
October 7, 2012
Lot 139
Frederick Hammersley
Figure of Speech
Estimate: $30,000 - $50,000
Price Realized: $87,500
May 6, 2012
Lot 140
Frederick Hammersley
Double Vision #12
Estimate: $9,000 - $12,000
Price Realized: $23,750
May 6, 2012
Lot 141
Frederick Hammersley
Two for One
Estimate: $10,000 - $15,000
Price Realized: $16,250
May 6, 2012
Lot 89
Frederick Hammersley
Cleave (#2)
Estimate: $35,000 - $45,000
Price Realized: $43,750
December 11, 2011

About The Artist

 

In May 1959, Frederick Hammersley found himself conversing with Lorser Feitelson, Karl Benjamin, and John McLaughlin at Feitelson’s studio in a meeting organized by Pomona College’s art department chair, Peter Selz. These four artists shared a distinctive method of painting similar to early 20th-century European geometric abstraction. Their collaboration, a collective unveiling of a new trend in painting, culminated in September of the same year with an exhibition at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, entitled “Four Abstract Classicists.” One of the youngest of the group, Hammersley had served in World War II and attended the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris and Chouinard Art Institute in Los Angeles. While teaching at Pomona College and the Pasadena Art Museum in the 1950s, he painted using his “hunch” method, an unconscious approach that involved building upon a chosen shape through instinctively matched colors. In the 1960s and 70s, his technique evolved by incorporating preplanned sketches and color arrangements. Two of these resulting Hard Edge compositions, Figure of Speech (1974-1975) and Double Vision #12 (1978), exemplify the bold colors and sharp lines that established Hammersley in modern painting vocabulary. While continuing to maintain his striking lines and colors, in the 1980s Hammersley revisited an “organic” style that focused on the interplay of nebulous forms. Enclosed in a wooden frame Hammersley constructed himself, Two for One (1986) unites his “hunch” method roots and the Hard Edge style that launched his career.


"Frederick Hammersley." Frederick Hammersley Foundation. Frederick Hammersley Foundation, 2012. Web. 24 March 2012.

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