LAMA BLOG

Peter’s Auction Pick of the Day: Joe Goode

October 16, 2019

Over the course of his six decade-long career, Joe Goode has acutely explored the nature of perception and the fluid relationship between representation and abstraction. Featured in the Pasadena Art Museum’s 1962 exhibition, New Painting of Common Object, Joe Goode’s breakout milk bottle series earned him national recognition and a prominent place within the Pop art canon. While others in his orbit continued mining the debris of pop culture and commercial media, Goode turned his creative attention to natural forces and “the elements” in the 1970s. Despite adopting this more ‘conventional’ subject matter, Goode’s framing of the natural world upheld his Pop interest in ‘everyday confrontations,’ a rejection of the Romantic or idyllic portrayals that populate art history.

Joe Goode, Forest Fire #64
October 20, 2019 Modern Art & Design Auction

Just as the icon of the milk bottle had presented itself to Goode on his doorstep, one early morning as he returned from working a night shift, so did the initial inspiration for his “Forest Fire” works. As remembered by the artist, one evening in the late 1970s, Goode was sitting on his porch in Springville, CA, and noticed a bright light coming up from behind a mountain. He recalls thinking to himself that it was “going to be the damnedest moon [he’d] ever seen in his life.” After waiting until nearly four o’clock in the morning for the supposed moon to emerge, Goode suddenly noticed the defined edges of small flames stretching upwards. The next day he asked a friend of his, who worked for the Forest Service, to bring him out to the site of the fire. Upon gazing through the blaze at the scenery he had been studying, Goode was awestruck by the magnitude of the destruction and the dissolution of the landscape’s visual character to which he had grown attached. In works such as Forest Fire #64 (Lot 90), the painter “[demystifies]” the “sublime” by giving pause to this unrelenting force. The still frame allows the viewer to peer into a fury that would otherwise inspire retreat. While Goode’s “pictorial image” constantly changes, he says that “what [he is] trying to do” remains resolute. From milk bottles to forest fires, Goode’s mode of “looking through” the world in his work stays the same.


LOT INFORMATION

Lot 90
Joe Goode
Forest Fire #64
1983
Oil on canvas in three parts
Center panel signed to canvas stretcher bar verso; left and right panels inscribed “64” to canvas stretcher bars verso; each retains James Corcoran Gallery label verso; center panel retains Charles Cowles Gallery label canvas stretcher bar verso
Canvas (overall): 66″ x 168.5″; Frame (overall): 67.25″ x 170″; (Canvas: 168 x 428 cm)
LAMA would like to thank the Joe Goode Studio for their assistance in cataloguing this work
Provenance: James Corcoran, Los Angeles, California; UCLA Health (gifted directly from the above)

Estimate: $30,000 – $50,000
October 20, 2019 Modern Art & Design Auction

Lot 91
Joe Goode
Tree #25 (A9)
1986
Oil on wood panel
Signed, dated, and inscribed “25” verso; retains James Corcoran Gallery label verso
Panel: 51.25″ x 48″; Frame: 53″ x 50.25″; (Panel: 130 x 122 cm)
LAMA would like to thank the Joe Goode Studio for their assistance in cataloguing this work
Provenance: James Corcoran, Los Angeles, California; UCLA Health (gifted directly from the above)

Estimate: $12,000 – $15,000
October 20, 2019 Modern Art & Design Auction

Lot 92
Joe Goode
Tree #11
1986
Oil on linen
Retains Holly Solomon Gallery and two James Corcoran Gallery labels verso
Linen: 28.25″ x 22″; Frame: 30.375″ x 24.25″; (Linen: 72 x 56 cm)
LAMA would like to thank the Joe Goode Studio for their assistance in cataloguing this work
Provenance: James Corcoran, Los Angeles, California; UCLA Health (gifted directly from the above)

Estimate: $8,000 – $12,000
October 20, 2019 Modern Art & Design Auction

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